The Best Alternatives to Thrift Stores

best alternatives to thrift stores
best alternatives to thrift stores
best alternatives to thrift stores
best alternatives to thrift stores
best alternatives to thrift stores

Okay. So. It’s been a while. A long while. Basically, I just could not keep up with blogging and university and work and everything else going on in my life. Then I went away, and trying to find time to blog was far from easy. But I’m back (SO excited to be working again), and after one whirlwind week of exams I’ll have plenty of time for blogging and making amazing things and actually doing what I want to do instead of going through soul-destroying torture each day (university, I’m looking at you).

Today I’m giving you some of my favourite alternatives to thrift stores and charity shops. I’ve spoken about thrifting a couple of times recently, as a cheaper alternative to sometimes pricy sustainable fashion brands. While I love thrifting, and can think of nothing better than spending the day rummaging through mothball-scented frocks, to a lot of people that conjures up images of the fires of hell. So. What do you do when you want to save some money, but can’t bring yourself to visit a dusty old warehouse? Head to the internet, of course.

best alternatives to thrift stores
best alternatives to thrift stores
best alternatives to thrift stores
best alternatives to thrift stores
best alternatives to thrift stores

Facebook:

This is the only one of these options that I’ve actually used, as both a buyer and a seller. Go on Facebook and search for “Your area + secondhand”. Chances are good that a couple of groups will pop up that are based in your town, where you can post your old stuff and how much you want for it. If no groups come up, start your own and invite all your friends to get things going.

The nice thing about this is – because the people live in the same town as you – you don’t have to go to the hassle of waiting for things to arrive in the post or stress that you’ve paid for something that will never arrive. You can just arrange to meet up with the person and collect it. Always remember to be sensible though, and meet in a public place, preferably with someone. Just because someone has great taste in shoes, it doesn’t mean they’re not a wackjob. I’ve sold a couple of shirts this way, and bought the boots I’m wearing in this post. All in all I’ve had a really good experience with it.

best alternatives to thrift stores
best alternatives to thrift stores
best alternatives to thrift stores
best alternatives to thrift stores

Depop:

Every blogger and their aunt seems to use Depop to sell the clothes that are bursting out of their wardrobes. Sadly, it hasn’t taken off in South Africa, so I haven’t had many opportunities to buy. Most people I know who’ve used it have been pretty happy with the whole process though.┬áBecause so many bloggers use Depop to sell clothes they’ve been gifted and only worn once or twice for shoots, it definitely caters to the fashion-savvy, and you can often find pieces┬áthat are still in stores like New Look, Topshop, and Zara for a fraction of the price.

best alternatives to thrift stores
best alternatives to thrift stores
best alternatives to thrift stores
best alternatives to thrift stores
best alternatives to thrift stores

Ebay:

So I know Nastygal eventually went bankrupt, but before that it became hugely successful, and it all started right here. There are millions of people selling their old clothes on eBay, and you can find some amazing pieces for huge bargains. Unfortunately, I’ve found eBay to be the online equivalent of real-life thrift stores. It’s a bit cleaner (I hope, since you’re probably browsing from your house), but you have to trawl through a lot of crap to get to the good stuff. If you’re willing to search though, you can bag some amazing finds.

Let me know your experiences with these, and if you have any recommendations for online thrift stores!

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